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¯I lageplan
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Assembly D2


Newbuild of a residential and commercial unit for a housing cooperative

Location: Donaustraße 2, 12043 Berlin-Neukölln

Year: 2018 -

Team IFUB*: Johannes Krohne, Bernhard Kurz, Miguel Lopez, Mikus Druviņš

Together with:
Winfried Härtel / Project development - www.winfriedhaertel.de

Client: Baugruppe D2

Housing cooperatives

are a very popular model in Berlin when it comes to creating new housing. Several parties join forces, pool their common interests and finances, and build one or more houses together. The beauty of housing cooperatives? The future owners are involved in the process from the beginning and can also influence the concept and design.
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¯I roof supervision
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The gap

in Donaustraße 2 had never been fully built on and was sold to the building group consisting of several young families after a workshop and garage rental business located there went out of business. The planning task was not a little complex. The very long parcel only had a short section to be built on to the street to the north, but a large, narrow inner courtyard area that also had to be built on. Due to the high price of land and the tight housing situation in Berlin, the maximum utilisation of the plot was set.
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¯I street view front building
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The gap in the edge of the block, which is required by building law, is located directly at the southern end of the very long Pannierstraße at a small intersection. In response to this, the

front building

was designed with a high point that also visually picks up the street-facing gables of the neighbouring buildings and moderates the different eaves heights of the neighbouring buildings to the right and left. The building is thus harmoniously integrated into the urban space, which is also helped by the urban perforated façade with its stepped base storey. This houses two commercial units to revitalise the district, whereby the colourful glazed clinker brick slips already visually indicate the building in the rear courtyard.
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¯I yard view
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The front building also has generous south-facing balconies to the rear. The balconies on both sides already indicate a special feature. All the residential floors of the front building are designed in such a way that either one large or two smaller flats are possible. These can also be divided or combined very easily at a later date. The

convertibility

is one of the essential parameters in the design of durable and long-lasting buildings.
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¯I Convertibility front building
Plan: IFUB* I¯
The

convertibility

is one of the essential parameters in the design of durable and long-lasting buildings. That is why the apartments in the front building are designed in such a way that they can be divided or combined very easily, even at a later date.
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¯I bird's eye view garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The

garden house

in the rear courtyard was attached to the existing fire wall there and staggered in height to comply with the statutory distance areas. The south- and east-facing setbacks were designed as terraces and thus provide maximum outdoor living quality.
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¯I safety staircase
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The view from the front of the house to the garden house shows - even walls free of fire loads do not have to be unsightly! The open

safety staircase

located at the front of the garden house must be surrounded by non-combustible building materials for fire safety reasons. With this trick, installation areas for the fire brigade could be completely avoided and the courtyard could be designed as a garden. Bicycles and rubbish were also stored in the basement, thus keeping the courtyard completely free. The non-combustible coloured clinker brick slips therefore develop from the basement of the front building over the entire façade towards the sky in the truest sense of the word.
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¯I garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
Due to the building law restrictions on volume, the floor plan design in the garden house is significantly more heterogeneous than in the front building. A

mix of apartments

from the compact 1.5 room flat to the 6 room maisonette ensured that the different wishes of the new residents could be reflected. A special highlight - the flats on the ground floor have their own small gardens instead of balconies.
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¯I wooden facade
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The different façade materials are a special feature. The front building was designed in

larch wood,

which, due to jointless installation and large board widths, reflects the flatness of the adjacent rendered façades, but points to the façade construction in wood sandwich construction, which is rather unusual for the quarter. This was combined with white-glazed wooden windows and sheet metal work made of galvanised steel.
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¯I Clinker brick facade
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The

glazed brick slips

were sourced from a local manufacture in the Berlin area. As a connecting element of the façades of both buildings on the site, the plinth of the front building as well as the staircase wall and the plinth of the garden house were designed in a graphic of cheerful, bright colours.
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¯I aluminium facade
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The safety staircase had as a requirement not only a non-combustible building envelope towards the stairwell - but a non-combustible façade skin for the entire building. Therefore, in addition to the tiles, a façade made of untreated and thus 100% recyclable corrugated sheet metal made of

aluminium

was chosen. The wall construction, as well as the balconies and windows, were permitted in wood, which means that the design of the front and garden house relate to each other not only through window formats but also through materiality. Coloured fabric awnings complete the picture.
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¯I garden and front house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The three façade materials at a glance. Larch wood in the front building, aluminium in the garden house and the coloured clinker brick slips on both buildings. The window formats with their distinctive cross were installed 45cm above the ground and are thus designed as possible

sit-in windows.

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¯I front gardens and patio
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The gardens along the garden house are assigned to the flats in front. The central

inner courtyard

between the garden house and the front house is reserved for the house community and has a directly connected flexibly usable community room. The partitions between the private garden areas were deliberately designed without fences, using only plants - which, like all the other plantings in the entire outdoor area, bear edible fruit. In any case, every possible vertical and horizontal surface was planted with vegetation, which will only show its full bloom in a few years.
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¯I View from the roof terrace
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
In order to cultivate the community in the house, there are

roof terraces

on both buildings with a great view and for all residents to use. From the roof terrace of the front building, you can see the whole of Pannierstraße as far as Görlitzer Park.
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¯I Terrace garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
At the southernmost end of the property is the largest maisonette with a wonderful, sheltered

terrace

that is sure to become even greener in no time. The nesting boxes for the swifts are visible in the background.
The view into one of the ground floor flats of the garden house at nightfall shows the beautiful transition from reflection to insight through the large

lifting-sliding door systems

made of wood present in all flats.
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¯I passage
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The flexibility of the residential uses had its (ecological) price. Due to the more difficult sound insulation requirements for recessed flat partitions, it would have been significantly more complex and expensive to construct the supporting structure in timber. For these reasons, a

hybrid construction

with the load-bearing structure in solid construction and the façade in timber construction had to be chosen. This is reflected in the central corridor, which is left in raw reinforced concrete and provides the necessary robustness as the most frequently used space in the entire building.
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¯I Central passage
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
To make things quick, there are automatically opening doors for the

central passage

in the front building. The slightly sloping passageway takes bicycles, prams and walkers past the coloured letterboxes on a direct route to the parking spaces in the basement of the garden house. Thanks to Berlin's parking space regulations, an underground garage for cars was not necessary and for many reasons also undesirable. This saved a lot of CO2 and costs and was the only reason why a green inner courtyard was possible in the first place.
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¯I Staircase front building
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The staircase in the front building

is a very reduced solid construction without any great demands on the surfaces. Reinforced concrete and white-painted, unrendered sand-lime brick walls characterise the image. The lift doors carry the colours of the tiles from the façade into the house and provide splashes of colour on all floors.
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¯I Ceiling above the entrance corridor
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The building services concept

is based on an exhaust-air heat pump that produces domestic hot water from the heat of the exhaust air from the flats and automatically ensures the air is circulated via outside wall air diffusers, thus providing the necessary air exchange. The system is combined with municipal district heating for space heating and photovoltaic modules on the roof to support the operation of the heat pump.
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¯I Living room and balcony front house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The balconies

in the front building are designed in such a way that they combine the advantages of a loggia with those of a balcony. You have both a more protected part with side walls and a part that overhangs the façade through which more light can fall onto the balcony.
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¯I Living room and terrace 4th floor garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The interiors

of the flats could be designed by the residents. For the ceilings, for example, they could choose between a cheaper version in exposed concrete or a plastered version. The floor coverings were also freely selectable.
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¯I Interior staircase EG Garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
Upon request, the residents were also supported in designing the interior spaces. Here, the

interior staircase

designed by IFUB* of one of the maisonettes in the garden house.
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¯I Kitchen ground floor summer house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The kitchen

in the flat in question was designed to match the staircase. As a healthy living material, only spruce wood was used for the fixtures, which was painted with pure linseed oil.
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¯I Detail staircase
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The staircase in detail.

Spruce wood painted with linseed oil meets oiled oak wood. Oak-backed recessed finger holes complete the design.
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¯I Kitchen ground floor garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
Also in the other maisonette in the garden house there is a very chic

kitchen,

this time designed by the residents of the apartment themselves. It harmonizes perfectly with the interior staircase there, designed by the IFUB* with a green steel grid.
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¯I Kitchen ground floor garden house
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
Another kitchen in a small flat in the garden house was designed in a similar way. Here, strategically placed

mirrors

enlarge the rather small space.
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¯I Kitchen 1st floor front building
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
IFUB* also designed a

kitchen

in the front building. This develops around the corner from the access corridor and thus makes optimal use of the available space.
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¯I handle detail
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
As always with IFUB*, special attention was paid to the

handle details,

which are available in two different versions in this kitchen. Shown here as a coloured section in one of the oak fronts.
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¯I bath
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯

The bathrooms

could also be individually designed. Starting with a standard tile that is available in many different colours and formats, a variety of designs were possible. Here as vertically laid 10x30cm tiles in three different colour shades.
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¯I Shower bath
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
Here is another

shower bath

with colour gradations in a different colour spectrum.
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¯I bathtub
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
For this resident, a coloured bathtub niche made of 10x10cm tiles was designed for his

bath.

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¯I bath
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
Other

tiles

were also possible on request. Here, different grey tiles were combined with small coloured niches.
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¯I Shower and bath
PHOTO: THOMAS STRAUB I¯
The residents were also able to influence the fittings and the bathroom layout. Here, a

shower and bath

was combined with black fittings, plain white wall tiles and a floor of terrazzo tiles.
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¯I Erdgeschoss/Souterrain
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Floor plan: ground floor

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¯I 1. Obergeschoss
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Floor plan: 1st floor

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¯I 3. Obergeschoss
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Floor plan: 3rd floor

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¯I 5. Obergeschoss
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Floor plan: 5th floor

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¯I Dachterrassen
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Roof terraces

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¯I Längsschnitt
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Longitudinal section

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¯I Plan and implementation
Photos: Thomas Straub, Renderings: Mojoimages I¯
A little fun at the very end,

Renderings vs. photo

What are the pictures before construction and what are the pictures after construction?
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¯I Querschnitt Vorderhaus
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Cross section: front building

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¯I Querschnitt Gartenhaus
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Cross section: garden house