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¯I Site plan
Plan:IFUB* I¯

Beim Fuchs


Conversion and renovation of a historically protected farm into offices and commercial space

Location: Münchner Straße 63, 85774 Unterföhring, Germany

Year: 2016-2020

Project: Arge Peter Deck und IFUB*

Team IFUB*: Bernhard Kurz, Moritz Penker, Johannes Krohne

In Collaboration with:
Zuzana Giertlová / Fire Safety Concept
IFB Eigenschenk / Structural Surveying
HFR Ingenieure / Structural Planning
A&A / Heating, Sanitation and Ventilation Planning
IB Lautenschlager / Electrical Planning
luxophil lighting / Lighting Concept

Client: Maria-Theresia Deck

In press: CUBE Munich 01/22

Awards: 2nd place Bayerischer Denkmalpreis 2022
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¯I Street view after renovation
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
What would he say, former mayor and “Loam Baron” Josef Gloo, who built

Beim Fuchs

in Unterföhring near Munich? What would he say if he knew that almost 120 years after building his befitting residence at the center of his municipality, it is still being cherished by his direct descendants? What would he say about the property’s new incarnation - its conversion and restoration - set in motion by his great-great-grandson in collaboration with IFUB*? We'll never know, but one thing is for sure: this house is as magnificent now as it was back then.
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¯I Historical Foto
Foto: Unbekannt I¯
This is what the property looked like at the beginning of the

19th century

- half farm, half Mayoral residence. A bit of local history: the farm’s name, “Beim Fuchs”, (“at the fox’s”) comes not from its (human) residents, but rather from the chestnut-colored horses, so-called “Fuchsn”, that were supposedly very popular on the farm.
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¯I Josef Gloo - the erector
Foto: unknown I¯
Josef Gloo was one of the so-called, turn-of-the-century

“Loam Barons”.

A local citizen who, with his clay-rich estate, brought prosperity and prestige to his town via a burgeoning brick industry. A particularly progressive man, Mayor Gloo not only initiated the construction of the Leinthaler Bridge, but also brought electricity to Unterföhring - even before it was available in Munich.
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¯I Roof ornament
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The roof and facade are

highly adorned

on the front side of the building, which would have originally been the living quarters. In accordance with the listed-building consent order, the facade was carefully restored and painted in colors sympathetic to its historical roots. Work on the roof proved much more complex: the structure, expanded by new insulation, had to be designed in such a way that the historic proportions were not impaired, but rather subtly extended and optimized.
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¯I Wall dormer
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The wall dormer

shines in renewed splendor. The carefully chosen colors of the facade and roof harmonize with the refreshed red of the original windows and the wrought-iron balcony grilles. The gable ornament was unfortunately completely lost and has been replaced with a simplified version based on the original design. The weather vane, which had been blown down in a storm many years ago, was restored and reinstated.
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¯I Window front building
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
A particularly beautiful detail is the original curved glass in the exterior box sash windows. The metal fixtures of the

wooden shutter blinds

were preserved and the wooden slats replaced.
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¯I Rear view after renovation
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
Once the barn, the rear part of the building has always been less decorative. Here, the only change has been to the facade. Windows were installed to the former hayloft in the south, and the existing fixed

slat shutters

were converted to hinged versions that can be opened and closed. To the west, a new entrance with a steel cantilever staircase provides access and serves as a fire escape route, allowing this part of the building a range of possible new uses.
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¯I Rear view after renovation
Foto Sorin Morar I¯

The freestanding awning

on the north side of the building was in serious danger of collapse. A clever structural design was used to redistribute the weight, eliminating the need for support columns. A ramp for disabled-access will be installed on the first floor as part of the redesign of this outdoor area.
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¯I awning in Detail
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
During the course of the

historically-attentive restoration,

only truly unsalvageable parts of the roof structure were replaced, as can be seen on the old rafters of the awning.
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¯I New external staircase
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The railing design on the freestanding

external staircase

borrows from elements of the original building, thus fitting harmoniously into the overall ensemble.
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¯I Corridor GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
Entering the house through the main entrance, one arrives in the central

corridor.

Here, the vaulted ceilings and tiled floors were restored and the murals were brought back to life. The walls received a fresh lick of paint and the skirting was highlighted in an elegant slate-blue tone.
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¯I Corridor GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
On the first floor, a wide interior opening was needed to provide easy access to the new barrier-free restroom. A brick

arch,

blends into the vaulted hallway as if it had always been there.
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¯I Stairwell GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The

stairwell

was fitted with new pendant lights. It was possible to retrofit them without causing any damage, helping them to look almost like part of the original inventory.
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¯I Stairwell GF/1F
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The original staircase,

which was already well preserved, was carefully restored. Murals were discovered on the walls throughout the hall and stairwell. These were exposed but otherwise left in the condition in which they were found. The skirting was protected with a new coat of paint in a matching color, and works as a unifying element connecting the different levels.
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¯I Murals Corridor 1F
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
Reaching the upper floor, the eyes are met with a decorated section of wall on which the original skirting has been restored. The painted inserts on the dado imitate various natural stones. Above, floral

ornamentation

with stylized leaves and flowers frames the wall’s surfaces.
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¯I Corridor 1F
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
At the end of the hallway on the upper floor, a new set of steps and a

new doorway

provide direct access to the former hayloft. The old plank floor has been treated with a dark linseed-oil paint to reference the dark wood of the skirting.
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¯I Rooms GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The rooms on the ground floor

of the former living quarters showcase quite different floors and ceilings - a reflection of their original use. In two of the rooms, herringbone parquet flooring and ornate ceilings were rediscovered. The ceiling in the kitchen was unadorned, but here the historic tiles could be saved. In another room, the original floor had become dilapidated and was replaced with new herringbone parquet. All the walls in these rooms are, in fact, equally ornately painted. In order to protect these historic features whilst at the same time making the spaces more fitting to their intended use as offices, the walls were coated with a removable soft distemper.
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¯I Tiled Stove GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
In the front part of the house are four

historic tiled stoves,

all of which have been restored to full working order. At some point in the past, the green stove on the ground floor had been completely dismantled. It has now been reassembled in a new position.
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¯I Rooms 1F
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
Equally wonderful painted ceilings can be found in

the rooms on the upper floor,

which incorporate different style elements from Baroque to Art Nouveau. The original plank floors throughout this floor were uncovered and painted with a light linseed-oil paint. As on the ground floor, the wall murals were concealed and protected with removable soft distemper. One fascinating discovery was a room that used to be divided in two - something still evident from both the ceiling and the floor.
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¯I Views 1F
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
A door taken out of the first floor was reinstalled on the upper floor and now provides a

view

between rooms.
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¯I window handle Detail
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
All of the wooden box sash windows were repainted. Seals were also added and the

fittings

were brought back to working order. A wooden window will last forever if well cared for!
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¯I Former Attic TF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The attic

over the front of the house had never been developed and was used primarily as storage. Up until now, that is. Everything other than the staircase, which already existed, was designed new to fit the style of the period. For this reason, the new spruce floor is painted with linseed-oil paint in the same shade as on the upper floor. As was the case throughout the rest of the house, special emphasis was placed on ecological building materials and a complete avoidance of plastics.
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¯I Former Attic TF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The guiding principle when designing the interior of the roof space was to incorporate

attic charm,

for example by reinstating exposed wooden cladding. Not only is the roof now protected with wood fiber insulation, but it has also been designed to function as an acoustic ceiling. The entrance, stairs, coatrack, toilets, and kitchenette, were all brought together in a single unit and set into the main space, much like an interior edifice. The old fireplaces and the smokehouse were retained and whitewashed.
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¯I balcony door TF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
Since the attic had never been developed, the existing

windows

were simple. These were retained and reinforced with new interior fitted wooden windows, as well as ecological insulation made from cellulose, to provide an optimal climate and maximum comfort in what will be new office space.
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¯I cistern / couch
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
This original

cistern,

found in the attic, is evidence that the farm was truly ahead-of-its-time. Back in the day, it provided the residents with running water long before such was the norm. Even now, the cistern contributes to the well-being of the new residents - tipped on its side, it has been converted into a comfortable sofa, complete with feet and cushions.
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¯I roof inscription
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The year of construction had been immortalized on the historic rafters with the inscription “Prosit 1900”. To honor the new stage of life,

“Secundum 2018”

was added to one of the new beams for the topping-out ceremony.
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¯I Vaulted hall
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The rear part of the building, the former barn, is also full of architectural gems. At the time of construction, those who could afford it avoided building barns with exposed wooden rafters, as the beams were susceptible to corrosion from livestock emissions and could quickly lose their load-bearing strength. It was for this reason that, with a great deal of effort, we saved this splendid

groined vault ceiling

from collapse. With a new plank floor and freshly whitewashed walls, we transformed a simple stable into an impressive vaulted hall.
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¯I vaulted hall
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The vaulted hall

has two parts with different heights and is directly connected to the main hallway. Thus, it is possible to gain a view that extends through the entire building. Unified light fittings visually connect the parts of the building.
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¯I granite column
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
A detail of the beautifully designed transition from

granite column

to vault, visible in the former barn.
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¯I Former hayloft
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
A view through the entire building is also possible from the former

hayloft

at the rear of the building. Previously difficult to access, the room is now connected to the hallway on the upper floor, but also accessible via its own external staircase. Formerly designed to optimize the circulation of air, the installation of windows and skylights means this room is now all about capturing light. New underfloor heating, combined with the insulation in the roof and interior walls, means the owners have endless possibilities when deciding how to use this space in the future.
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¯I Former Hayloft
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
On the west gable side, the new door not only serves as an escape route but also provides the option of using this part of the building as a self-contained unit with separate access. The

unsupported roof structure,

reinforced with fine steel struts, maximizes the useable area within the room whilst meeting today’s standards.
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¯I construction Detail
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The construction

in detail. New reinforced concrete columns and girders stabilize both roof and walls whilst simultaneously supporting the external freestanding awning. The fir timber rafters were restored in accordance with the listed building consent order - the care with which this was carried out is evident from the color of the wood. Like in the converted loft at the front of the building, white roof cladding functions as an acoustic ceiling.
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¯I old hay loader
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
The old

hay loader,

complete with ladder and conveyor belt, was preserved and made secure. The hatch to the roof was glazed and converted into a “light house”, bringing in additional light during the day and acting like a lantern in the evening.
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¯I WC GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
On each floor there are now

his and hers WCs.

The narrow, elongated bathrooms on the first and upper floors were converted into vestibules for the ladies' restrooms. The ground floor WC was newly tiled with a design and color scheme borrowed from the original tiles in the kitchen and hallway.
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¯I Sink unit 1F
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

The sink units

were specially designed for the project and are modeled on traditional steel-framed wash stands. The colors of the tiles vary on each floor: blue on the ground floor, red on the first floor, and green in the newly converted loft.
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¯I Shower Room GF
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯

A shower room

for the staff was also created. The blue murals that were exposed here harmonize perfectly with the tiles chosen for all of the WCs and washrooms on the ground floor. Oiled oak shelves and trim create a clean transition between old and new.
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¯I Utility rooms
Foto: Sorin Morar I¯
In the course of the renovation, the building’s technical facilities were comprehensively updated. To this end, the coal and potato cellars were spruced up and converted into

utility rooms.

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¯I site plan
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Site plan

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¯I Ground Floor
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Ground Floor

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¯I 1st Floor
Plan: IFUB* I¯

1st Floor

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¯I Top floor
Plan: IFUB* I¯

top floor

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¯I Elevation East
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Elevation East

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¯I Elevation West
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Elevation West

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¯I Elevation South
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Elevation South

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¯I Elevation North
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Elevation North

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¯I Cross section front building
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Cross section front building

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¯I Cross section rear building
Plan: IFUB* I¯

Cross section rear building